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Conservation officer finds support from cubs

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July 10, 2015

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Conservation officer finds support from cubs

Thousands of supporters are suggesting the reinstatement of British Columbia conservation officer Brian Casavant, who stands suspended for refusing to destroy a couple of black bear cubs Sunday just after their mother was killed for routinely breaking into a Vancouver Island resident’s freezer for meaty food.

An online petition on behalf of Bryan Casavant was close Thursday to accomplishing its goal of 75,000 signatures, which would be sent out to B.C. Environment Minister Mary Polak. Perhaps due to the pressure, Casavant’s salary has since been reinstated, while an examination into the matter proceeds.

Casavant, rather than following orders to euthanize the cubs, gave them to a veterinary hospital, and they’re currently under care at a facility operated by the North Island Wildlife Recovery Association.

Conservation officer refuses to kill bear cubs

According to the CBC News, the brother-and-sister cubs were rounded up after they went back to the family home, looking for their mother. The 8-week-old cubs had gone up a tree, where they were calling for their mother.

Since the mother bear had become habituated to human food, it’s practical that the cubs had become conditioned, also. Change of location is problematic because it commonly just relocates the issue, and with cubs it ends up being a lot more challenging because they perhaps would not survive on their own.

Retired wildlife expert Barrie Gilbert Informed CBS News that the outcry that has spread on social media– with U.K. actor-comedian Ricky Gervais among those sounding in– has a lot more to do with “heart strings” than conservation.

Gilbert stated that bear cubs have only a 50-50 possibility of survival during their first year with mom either way, which a single journey with mom to a freezer loaded with salmon can be adequate to habituate them.

Bears are not threatened at all. My personal value system is I ‘d rather see people put their effort into threatened populations like marmots on Vancouver Island.”.

Polak said in a statement:.

“This is a very sad and unfortunate situation. Although conservation officers must sometimes put down wild animals for the safety of the public and the welfare of the animal, we understand how difficult it is for all involved.”.

“It’s a value call really,” Gilbert said. “Bears are not threatened at all. My personal value system is I ‘d rather see people put their effort into threatened populations like marmots on Vancouver Island.”.

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